Dec 01, 2018 by Bob Carlson
blog

Lawyers learn stress early. They stress through three years of law school, they stress preparing for and taking the bar exam, and they stress at highly competitive jobs in law firms, corporations, and government.

Relevant Subjects

Ask the LifeQuake Doctor

Submitted by Toni Galardi on fri, 12/01/2018

Dear Dr. Galardi, I’m a forty-seven-year-old recovering alcoholic. I’ve been in sustained recovery for five years. I go to AA meetings regularly, but lately I’ve been feeling that something’s missing. I know there is such a thing as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but is that the same thing as a “thought addiction”? I notice that I sometimes have negative thoughts about people when I’m feeling bad about my life or myself, so I’m wondering: Is negative thinking about others is a form of...

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We've Seen a Thing or Two

Submitted by Gary Seidler on fri, 12/01/2018

As a recovering journalist, publisher, observer, and commentator, I am struck by the enormity of current developments in the world of addiction. We can all agree that chemical and behavioral addictions can no longer be swept under the rug. We are now more aware of the elephant in the room. The good news is that the stigma of addiction is slowly but surely lifting. Like the insurance ad says, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” We come to the end of a tumultuous year with...

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Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

Read More...

We've Seen a Thing or Two

Submitted by Gary Seidler on fri, 12/01/2018

As a recovering journalist, publisher, observer, and commentator, I am struck by the enormity of current developments in the world of addiction. We can all agree that chemical and behavioral addictions can no longer be swept under the rug. We are now more aware of the elephant in the room. The good news is that the stigma of addiction is slowly but surely lifting. Like the insurance ad says, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” We come to the end of a tumultuous year with...

Read More...

Simple Solutions or Real Results

Submitted by Gerald Shulman on fri, 12/01/2018

In a previous column (April 2018), I wrote about the genesis of the opioid crisis. While possibly informative, it provided little information about potential solutions currently being offered and identifying those whose major effect is more to make people feel good about doing something, whether effective or not. One of the points I made in the column was that the genesis of the current opioid crisis and its solutions are multifactorial. However, we continue to look for simple solutions while...

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Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

Read More...

We've Seen a Thing or Two

Submitted by Gary Seidler on fri, 12/01/2018

As a recovering journalist, publisher, observer, and commentator, I am struck by the enormity of current developments in the world of addiction. We can all agree that chemical and behavioral addictions can no longer be swept under the rug. We are now more aware of the elephant in the room. The good news is that the stigma of addiction is slowly but surely lifting. Like the insurance ad says, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” We come to the end of a tumultuous year with...

Read More...

Simple Solutions or Real Results

Submitted by Gerald Shulman on fri, 12/01/2018

In a previous column (April 2018), I wrote about the genesis of the opioid crisis. While possibly informative, it provided little information about potential solutions currently being offered and identifying those whose major effect is more to make people feel good about doing something, whether effective or not. One of the points I made in the column was that the genesis of the current opioid crisis and its solutions are multifactorial. However, we continue to look for simple solutions while...

Read More...

Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

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The Wisdom of Thich Nhat Hanh

Submitted by John Newport on fri, 12/01/2018

This column will attempt to illuminate practical applications of the teachings of my favorite mentor, Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk whom in my opinion is the foremost contemporary proponent of application of basic Buddhist precepts in our daily lives. While Thay (as he is known by his followers) is a leading practitioner of Zen Buddhism, his approach to helping us enrich our lives and the lives of those around us is extremely inclusive. Indeed, his followers include countless numbers of...

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Slow Down, You’re Going Too Fast, Part II

Submitted by John Newport on fri, 10/01/2018

In the first installment of this series I reviewed contributing factors to the pressure-cooker lifestyles that far too many working Americans accept as the norm. These include a corporate ethos that embraces the aggressive pursuit of profit—while increasingly viewing workers as mere tools of production—together with the 24/7 encroachment of work-related matters into our personal lives via e-mails and other electronic intrusions. Added to this is the practice of many companies of routinely laying...

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Intimacy in Counseling

Submitted by D. John Dyben on fri, 10/01/2018

Open your favorite academic search engine and query “intimacy in counseling” or some variation on that theme. The vast majority of articles, chapters, and books you will find referenced address how counselors help patients deal with intimacy in their relationships. This is certainly how it should be, given the importance of the topic in our field. However, there is another aspect of intimacy in counseling that is also highly relevant yet less frequently discussed: intimacy in counseling and...

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We've Seen a Thing or Two

Submitted by Gary Seidler on fri, 12/01/2018

As a recovering journalist, publisher, observer, and commentator, I am struck by the enormity of current developments in the world of addiction. We can all agree that chemical and behavioral addictions can no longer be swept under the rug. We are now more aware of the elephant in the room. The good news is that the stigma of addiction is slowly but surely lifting. Like the insurance ad says, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” We come to the end of a tumultuous year with...

Read More...

Simple Solutions or Real Results

Submitted by Gerald Shulman on fri, 12/01/2018

In a previous column (April 2018), I wrote about the genesis of the opioid crisis. While possibly informative, it provided little information about potential solutions currently being offered and identifying those whose major effect is more to make people feel good about doing something, whether effective or not. One of the points I made in the column was that the genesis of the current opioid crisis and its solutions are multifactorial. However, we continue to look for simple solutions while...

Read More...

Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

Read More...

Simple Solutions or Real Results

Submitted by Gerald Shulman on fri, 12/01/2018

In a previous column (April 2018), I wrote about the genesis of the opioid crisis. While possibly informative, it provided little information about potential solutions currently being offered and identifying those whose major effect is more to make people feel good about doing something, whether effective or not. One of the points I made in the column was that the genesis of the current opioid crisis and its solutions are multifactorial. However, we continue to look for simple solutions while...

Read More...

Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

Read More...

When Words Are Not Enough: Why Experiential Forms of Healing Are Desirable in Treating Relational Trauma

Submitted by Tian Dayton on fri, 10/01/2018

We need to feel the stories of our lives in order to heal them, but trauma is all about not feeling. Even asking the question, “Can you tell me about your trauma?” can be befuddling, if not disturbing, for ACoAs who have learned to rationalize and deny our pain and confusion in order to stay connected to the families we love and need. When we reduce therapy to only words—for example, when we ask first responders to tell us about the horror of watching groups of people lock arms on the top of a...

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