Dec 01, 2018 by Gerald Shulman
blog

In a previous column (April 2018), I wrote about the genesis of the opioid crisis.

Relevant Subjects

We've Seen a Thing or Two

Submitted by Gary Seidler on fri, 12/01/2018

As a recovering journalist, publisher, observer, and commentator, I am struck by the enormity of current developments in the world of addiction. We can all agree that chemical and behavioral addictions can no longer be swept under the rug. We are now more aware of the elephant in the room. The good news is that the stigma of addiction is slowly but surely lifting. Like the insurance ad says, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” We come to the end of a tumultuous year with...

Read More...

Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

Read More...

Passing the Bar: Mobilizing Lawyers to Create a Healthier Profession

Submitted by Bob Carlson on fri, 12/01/2018

Lawyers learn stress early. They stress through three years of law school, they stress preparing for and taking the bar exam, and they stress at highly competitive jobs in law firms, corporations, and government. Stress is often part of the legal profession’s culture. So perhaps it is no surprise that studies show a substantial proportion of lawyers and law students suffer from substance use disorders (SUDs), depression, and anxiety at far higher rates than the general public and even other...

Read More...

We've Seen a Thing or Two

Submitted by Gary Seidler on fri, 12/01/2018

As a recovering journalist, publisher, observer, and commentator, I am struck by the enormity of current developments in the world of addiction. We can all agree that chemical and behavioral addictions can no longer be swept under the rug. We are now more aware of the elephant in the room. The good news is that the stigma of addiction is slowly but surely lifting. Like the insurance ad says, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” We come to the end of a tumultuous year with...

Read More...

Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

Read More...

Passing the Bar: Mobilizing Lawyers to Create a Healthier Profession

Submitted by Bob Carlson on fri, 12/01/2018

Lawyers learn stress early. They stress through three years of law school, they stress preparing for and taking the bar exam, and they stress at highly competitive jobs in law firms, corporations, and government. Stress is often part of the legal profession’s culture. So perhaps it is no surprise that studies show a substantial proportion of lawyers and law students suffer from substance use disorders (SUDs), depression, and anxiety at far higher rates than the general public and even other...

Read More...

We've Seen a Thing or Two

Submitted by Gary Seidler on fri, 12/01/2018

As a recovering journalist, publisher, observer, and commentator, I am struck by the enormity of current developments in the world of addiction. We can all agree that chemical and behavioral addictions can no longer be swept under the rug. We are now more aware of the elephant in the room. The good news is that the stigma of addiction is slowly but surely lifting. Like the insurance ad says, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” We come to the end of a tumultuous year with...

Read More...

The Personal Journey of a Nonalcoholic through the AA Twelve Steps

Submitted by Gerald Shulman on fri, 10/01/2018

If you will indulge me, I would like to depart from my usual practice of writing about clinical issues and instead share the journey—mine—of a nonalcoholic within Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). I began my career as a therapist in February of 1962, at a facility previously called Chit-Chat Farms and now called Caron Foundation, founded in 1958. Like other programs at that time, it would not be considered treatment by today’s standards—it provided no assessment, no treatment planning, and no...

Read More...

We've Seen a Thing or Two

Submitted by Gary Seidler on fri, 12/01/2018

As a recovering journalist, publisher, observer, and commentator, I am struck by the enormity of current developments in the world of addiction. We can all agree that chemical and behavioral addictions can no longer be swept under the rug. We are now more aware of the elephant in the room. The good news is that the stigma of addiction is slowly but surely lifting. Like the insurance ad says, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two.” We come to the end of a tumultuous year with...

Read More...

Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

Read More...

The Wisdom of Thich Nhat Hanh

Submitted by John Newport on fri, 12/01/2018

This column will attempt to illuminate practical applications of the teachings of my favorite mentor, Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk whom in my opinion is the foremost contemporary proponent of application of basic Buddhist precepts in our daily lives. While Thay (as he is known by his followers) is a leading practitioner of Zen Buddhism, his approach to helping us enrich our lives and the lives of those around us is extremely inclusive. Indeed, his followers include countless numbers of...

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Lessons Learned from Clients in Co-Occurring Recovery Groups

Submitted by Dennis C. Daley on fri, 12/01/2018

For many years I conducted early recovery groups as a guest presenter in multiple inpatient, residential, and/or ambulatory treatment programs for clients with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (CODs). I also conducted recovery and/or focus groups at a therapeutic community program in the inner city, and for incarcerated adolescents or adults with CODs. I met regularly with clients to find out what their concerns were related to recovery from CODs, what they found helpful in...

Read More...

Passing the Bar: Mobilizing Lawyers to Create a Healthier Profession

Submitted by Bob Carlson on fri, 12/01/2018

Lawyers learn stress early. They stress through three years of law school, they stress preparing for and taking the bar exam, and they stress at highly competitive jobs in law firms, corporations, and government. Stress is often part of the legal profession’s culture. So perhaps it is no surprise that studies show a substantial proportion of lawyers and law students suffer from substance use disorders (SUDs), depression, and anxiety at far higher rates than the general public and even other...

Read More...

When Words Are Not Enough: Why Experiential Forms of Healing Are Desirable in Treating Relational Trauma

Submitted by Tian Dayton on fri, 10/01/2018

We need to feel the stories of our lives in order to heal them, but trauma is all about not feeling. Even asking the question, “Can you tell me about your trauma?” can be befuddling, if not disturbing, for ACoAs who have learned to rationalize and deny our pain and confusion in order to stay connected to the families we love and need. When we reduce therapy to only words—for example, when we ask first responders to tell us about the horror of watching groups of people lock arms on the top of a...

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